Lift grounded 
at design and 
craft centre

Grounded. The only lift serving the National Centre for Craft and Design has been out of action for over two months with no end in sight for those unable to take the stairs. EMN-151019-164608001
Grounded. The only lift serving the National Centre for Craft and Design has been out of action for over two months with no end in sight for those unable to take the stairs. EMN-151019-164608001

The only lift in one of Sleaford’s top visitor attractions has been out of action for more than two months leaving its exhibits out of reach of disabled visitors.

Lift technicians have made several trips to the National Centre for Craft and Design, which welcomes around 90,000 visitors a year, but are still awaiting a major electrical component that could only be re-manufactured in Italy to get things moving again.

This has meant that disabled visitors have no means of reaching any of the galleries or workshops unless they can manage the stairs.

There was no end in sight last Thursday when engineers were due to return, but cancelled as the new part has still not arrived.

A spokesman apologised for any inconvenience and said: “Since the lift broke on August 11, staff have done all that they can to help visitors continue to enjoy their experience at NCCD. Assistance has been provided where possible and notices have been posted to all social media platforms and websites to provide advance warning.”

Angry disabled Sleaford resident Pamela Hiscock, from Clinton Drive branded it a ‘disgrace’, saying she has had to miss courses as a result: “This means that both galleries and workrooms are inaccessible to the disabled, elderly and families with small children and pushchairs, and staff,” she said.

“I find it impossible to climb four flights to attend two of the different classes.”

NKDC Leisure and Cultural Services Manager Mike Lock said: “They have had to re-manufacture the part because the lift is ten years old. It has been very frustrating and very expensive.”

He said they do have a workshop unit across the courtyard but it would be too small for most classes. He said: “It depends on the kind of activity and the numbers attending.

“The situation is quite unprecedented. It is a small circuit board but plays a significant part.”