Welcome to the world of work for students

Year 10 students get to talk to a wide range of employers about potential career paths in the Kesteven and Sleaford High School World of Work Day. EMN-150427-143303001
Year 10 students get to talk to a wide range of employers about potential career paths in the Kesteven and Sleaford High School World of Work Day. EMN-150427-143303001

Year 10 students at a Sleaford school were given the opportunity to get an insight into their potential future careers at a special event.

The World of Work Day was held in the assembly hall of Kesteven and Sleaford High School and was put together by the school’s careers co-ordinator Pauline Hunter.

The students spent all morning in groups talking to 33 visiting representatives form 22 different employers and professions.

Deputy head teacher Jo Smith explained: “Each of our students has been able to select six sessions to target the jobs they are interested in finding out more about.”

The 14 and 15 year olds are in their first year of GCSEs and were keen to ask questions about what to expect when pursuing possible careers.

Employers included areas of the NHS such as nursing and midwifery, Lincolnshire Police, the Armed Forces, a primary school teacher, Quarrington Vets, Duncan and Toplis accountants, Siemens and Great Plains.

Stephen Oakden of BE Design, a firm of architects and designers, was one of those attending and said his indutry was crying out for more women. He said: “We can help by offering apprenticeships rather than expecting full-time degree students. That way they can do a degree without being saddled with a student loan debt.”

Student Tiegan Manners, 14, had talked to people about careers with the police, Army, RAF and midwifery. She said it had been useful to find out about a wide range of employers. She said: “They told me how I can get into the jobs and go further up the ranks, recommending colleges and universities.”

Chairman of governors at the school, Robin Baker, said: “This is part of breaking down some assumptions by students about these jobs.”