More is needed to slow down speeders

Lincolnshire Road Safety passive and reactive signs at Ancaster as part of a new trial. EMN-151127-154254001
Lincolnshire Road Safety passive and reactive signs at Ancaster as part of a new trial. EMN-151127-154254001

Over 100 residents have signed an online petition calling for more measures to slow down drivers speeding through their village.

Lynsey Draycott of Ermine Street, Ancaster, has launched the i-petition and appealed for people to sign it (currently 129 names at www.ipetitions.com/petition/ancaster-speed-safety/), saying: “We lost our beloved cat last week by a speeding driver who didn’t even stop. Our village has a 30mph speed limit but traffic does not abide by this.”

She said the route is also a ‘rat run’: “Road humps are the only way to put a stop to this. When you consider the amount of children walking to school, this really is a fatal accident waiting to happen.”

David Sayer, Ancaster Parish Council chairman, said a speed analysis along Ermine Street has provided facts and figures. He said: “The fact is that approximately 16 per cent of motorists exceed the speed limit by 5mph or more.”

The Road Safety Partnership has introduced wheelie bin signs saying “30mph” and the parish council have purchased a reactive speed warning sign, plus a number of ‘hi vis’ static signs. They are now calling for police speed enforcement along Ermine Street. Mr Sayer said: “We desperately do not want an accident or worse before measures are implemented.”

John Siddle, Communications Manager at Lincolnshire Road Safety Partnership, admitted that in residents’ eyes, the community speed watch signs may not be perceived to be having much effect, but believed some drivers will take notice as part of a package of measures being brought to bear on drivers through the village. He said: “They now have a chequer board down the centre of the road to make drivers feel like the road narrows. It feels like an open road and drivers forget there are parked cars and houses and people on pavements.

“There are no casualty statistics to authorise enforcement with mobile cameras, but that doesn’t stop the local policing team doing some enforcement,” he said.