DCSIMG

Organic use for those fallen leaves

A Generic Photo of leaves being raked in a garden. See PA Feature GARDENING Gardening Column. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/Thinkstockphotos. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature GARDENING Gardening Column.

A Generic Photo of leaves being raked in a garden. See PA Feature GARDENING Gardening Column. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/Thinkstockphotos. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature GARDENING Gardening Column.

Recycling garden debris is one of the best ways of boosting your soil and now’s the time to put your eco-friendly hat on and make some leaf mould out of fallen leaves.

Leaf mould is a humus-rich soil conditioner and richer moulds can be made by adding a few grass clippings.

Thick evergreen leaves such as holly need to be shredded and added to the normal compost heap. Pine needles break down extremely slowly but they are excellent for use on acid-loving plants.

In theory, you can compost anything organic, from kitchen peelings to eggshells, ash and newspaper as well as garden trimmings, but never add fish or meat which may attract rats.

There are many other soil improvers you can use. Many gardeners make their own compost, while others splash out at garden centres on spent mushroom compost, horse manure and composted green waste.

 
 
 

Back to the top of the page