Story of airships at Cranwell retold at museum

Submarine Scout 39 crashes in Thurlby on its delivery flight to Cranwell on November 15, 1916.
Photo Supplied by Cranwell Aviation Heritage Museum Archive EMN-170815-124752001
Submarine Scout 39 crashes in Thurlby on its delivery flight to Cranwell on November 15, 1916. Photo Supplied by Cranwell Aviation Heritage Museum Archive EMN-170815-124752001

Cranwell Aviation Heritage Museum will take to the skies with a new exhibition due to open next month.

The museum’s upcoming exhibition – Airships over Lincolnshire… Lighter than Air - will open to the public exploring the vital role of airships and hot air balloons have played and the involvement of the Lighter than Air Section at Cranwell.

A Submarine Scout airship being handled by US Naval ratings based at Cranwells Lighter than Air Section, 1918.
Photo supplied by Cranwell Aviation Heritage Museum Archive. EMN-170815-124803001

A Submarine Scout airship being handled by US Naval ratings based at Cranwells Lighter than Air Section, 1918. Photo supplied by Cranwell Aviation Heritage Museum Archive. EMN-170815-124803001

See their development over time, including the types of balloons and airships which operated from Cranwell, which began life as a Naval Air Service airship station.

Learn about the working life of an airship’s crew; find out about Zeppelin raids on Lincolnshire as well as the career of Barnes Wallis, a designer of airships.

This exhibition is open to the public from Saturday September 30 until Sunday March 25 2018. Admission is free.

Cranwell Aviation Heritage Museum portrays the story of RAF Cranwell from its early days as a Royal Naval Air Service base to the current day. It is open seven days a week from 10am each day.

For more information about this exhibition contact Cranwell Aviation Heritage Museum on 01529 488490 or email: cranwellaviation@n-kesteven.gov.uk.

For more information about Cranwell Aviation Heritage Museum please visit www.cranwellaviation.co.uk