United Lincolnshire Hospitals Trust CEO meets PM Boris Johnson asking for funding

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The Chief Executive of United Lincolnshire Hospitals Trust has met with Prime Minister Boris Johnson at Number 10 to ask for more funding.

Andrew Morgan, who oversees the running of Lincoln, Boston and Grantham hospitals, met with the PM at 10 Downing Street on Tuesday as part of an “Afternoon Tea for NHS Frontline Staff”.

He was joined by four others from ULHT for the appointment along with around 50 other NHS staff from around the country.

During the event, Mr Morgan and his colleagues were able to speak to Health Secretary Matt Hancock, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health and Social Care Nadine Dorries and Mr Johnson’s partner Carrie Symonds.

They also met the latest tenant of Number 10 – 15-week-old Jack Russell-cross Dilyn.

Mr Morgan said: “The PM came into the room and he headed straight for me and shook my hand, so I think he remembered us from his visit to Boston.

“He said he had a really good time during his visit, so I said ‘bearing in mind you gave us £21 million last time you’re very welcome to come back’.”

“I just thought, good on him for being able to turn up on a day like today,” added Mr Morgan, referring to Mr Johnson’s current attempts to deal with the latest Brexit turmoil.

Conversations during the event centred around mental health policy, staff recruitment and pensions.

The ULHT chief said he hoped the visit would help towards developing strong relations with senior politicians, adding that he was hoping to invite Mr Hancock and Mrs Dorries back to Lincolnshire.

Speaking to Local Democracy Reporters last month, Mr Morgan said he would be keeping the pressure on government for more funding.

Yesterday he said: “The purpose today was to remind them we exist and to use that to push for as much of the national cake as we can – we will continue to push our case.”

On a recent visit to Boston, Mr Johnson visited Pilgrim Hospital where he announced a £21.3million cash boost for the facility’s A&E care.

The money will help with a move towards defined urgent and emergency ‘care zones’ in an attempt to improve patient wait times and the flow of patients in and out of the department. This will allow patients needing emergency treatment to be seen and treated quicker.

Boston was one of 20 hospitals to share £850 million of funding.

The PM also pledged a £1 billion boost to NHS capital spending the tackle the most urgency infrastructure projects.