Insight into the life of village pub

A young Bill Tebb and his parents sat in the arches at the rear of their pub in Fulbeck. EMN-191208-152502001
A young Bill Tebb and his parents sat in the arches at the rear of their pub in Fulbeck. EMN-191208-152502001

A Sleaford man has offered an insight into life as a young boy growing up behind the bar of a village pub.

Bill Tebb of Westgate Park has kept old photos and memorabilia of the Hare and Hounds in Fulbeck, which his parents ran from 1931 until 1952.

He says: “My dad died in 1947 but my mother kept it on for another five years, then bought the cottage next door and went to work at RAF Waddington.”

Bill was born just two years after his parents took over the pub, which was tied to Mowbray’s Brewery of Grantham.

Bill even has a copy of the letter from his father when he applied to take on the pub tenancy having previously looked after the billiard tables at the gentlemen’s club in Spalding. The pub was in a poor state and he was hoping to negotiate a reduction in the rent.

The pub had stables where the coalman kept his horses.

Bill also has the first four months accounts of the pub, listing what was sold including 18 bottles of gin, 34 bottles of sherry, 103 bottles of house whisky, 10-and-a-half gallons of port, 698 dozen pints of pale ale and 479 dozen pints of mild.

He said: “I remember at the beginning of the war when all the troops were stationed at Fulbeck - the Gordon Highlanders, Welsh Fusiliers and the Airborne Division. The Welsh had a goat and they would feed it anything and bring it to the pub.”

He added: “I remember the soldiers coming back from the Battle of Arnhem and my mother fetched me down from bed to see to them. They had arms in slings, crutches and bandages and some were crying on each other’s shoulders.”