Bakery chain Cooplands poised to open store in Sleaford

Cooplands. EMN-170712-160630001
Cooplands. EMN-170712-160630001

Bakery chain Cooplands looks poised to move into Sleaford’s main shopping street.

The Scarborough-based chain, which has over 130 shops is applying for planning permission and listed building consent to convert the former William Hill betting shop premises at 25 Southgate, employing five full-time and two part-time staff, having been advertising for a shop manager and assistant manager.

The former William Hill betting shop in Southgate, Sleaford. EMN-170712-152322001

The former William Hill betting shop in Southgate, Sleaford. EMN-170712-152322001

Originating from a small pork butcher and pie shop in Scarborough, the company now we has over 130 shops and 11 cafés all over Yorkshire, Lincolnshire and the North East, with local branches in Lincoln Market Rasen, Skegness, Horncastle and Louth.

Presently, Cooplands employ over 1,500 people and remain a family owned company. Paul Coopland, the founders’ great grandson, is still Managing Director.

Popular products today include sausage rolls and made to order sandwiches.

The shop unit has stood empty for more than two years.

Cooplands at Horncastle The shop front is likely to look similar in Sleaford. EMN-170712-155416001

Cooplands at Horncastle The shop front is likely to look similar in Sleaford. EMN-170712-155416001

The planning applications would involve internal alterations and installation of a new, traditional style timber shop front and signage with repositioning of the doors of the premises which were previously a Woolwich building society branch prior to being a betting shop.

There would be a retail area and display counters at the front of the shop with preparation area behind, along with staff room and toilets.

According to its supporting information, the company says the premises are part of a terrace of three buildings listed as Grade II for architectural and historical significance.

It states: “The character and appearance of the existing late 20th century shopfront clearly detracts from the character of the Grade II listed host building, its setting and neighbouring listed building, and the character and appearance of the designated Sleaford Conservation Area. The proposal is designed to meet the operational needs of the applicant’s bakery business and to create a more welcoming shopping environment for the customer.”

They say the proposed work enhances the character of the building’s heritage in the Conservation Area and bring itg back to use.