Mum’s island cycle ride for heart charity

Evey Robinson - kept alive thanks to the BHF research. EMN-190521-101110001
Evey Robinson - kept alive thanks to the BHF research. EMN-190521-101110001

A Billingborough mum is planning a charity cycling event to raise money for the British Heart Foundatuion after her own daughter was born with congential heart disease.

Laura Robinson is hoping to raise £3,000 by cycling the Hebridean Way in July, already collecting £1,100 towards her target from donations.

Evey Robinson after undergoing one of her heart operations. EMN-190521-101059001

Evey Robinson after undergoing one of her heart operations. EMN-190521-101059001

She is hoping people will either sponsor her or help with supplies as she admits: “I am a novice at biking and I am going to need all the help I can get!”

The Hebridean Way is 185 miles long, which Laura hopes to complete in four days, covering 10 islands, six causeways and two ferry crossings in the process. 

Laura says: “I am absolutely terrified and I am going to need all the support I can get so I will be very grateful for every penny! I am an active person but the furthest I’ve ever biked is about 20 miles and that was tough.

“I’m going to have to cover almost twice that distance every day so it’s going to be a massive challenge. Plus I will be on my own and relying on my personal set of navigational skills to get me through.”

Laura says the Outer Hebrides is the windiest place in the UK and people who have completed this challenge all mention the weather can be an absolute game changer.

She said: “You are experiencing weather that has come across straight from the Arctic.”

Laura’s eldest daughter Evey has undergone three heart operations between the ages of six days old and four years. She suffered two strokes during the second operation which led to her being paralysed down her right side.

“We had months of physiotherapy to get her back to a good standard or mobility,” says Laura. “Alongside this, we had to inject her daily with a very painful medicine to ensure she wouldn’t have any further strokes.

“The diagnosis that Evey has was, up to 25 years ago, a death sentence.”

She says Evey, now aged eight is still alive and doing well due to the BHF research, but her future remains uncertain. “I’m hoping that in raising money for the BHF, I can help in providing a little more clarity on what her future may hold,” she said.

People can help by visiting www.justgiving.com/fundraising/laura-ruth75