Second referendum would be “dangerous and divisive”, says senior county councillor

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A senior Lincolnshire county councillor said a second EU referendum would be “dangerous and divisive” for the UK.

Colin Davie, cabinet member for economy and place at the county council, said he did not support the idea of a second vote, also known as a ‘People’s Vote’.

Some campaigners have called for another referendum if MPs cannot agree a way forward on a withdrawal deal with the European Union.

But Councillor Davie described the vote as being “bad for politics and bad for society”.

“A second referendum would be the most dangerous and divisive thing to happen to our country,” he said.

“We have had the biggest ever test of the population in the referendum on June 23, 2016 and more people voted in that than in anything before.

“Saying that we are going to ignore that and have another referendum would be so bad for politics and so bad for society.”

He added that holding another vote would lead to “a lot of trouble on the streets”.

But, former Prime Ministers John Major and Tony Blair have said that giving people a final say on the deal would be the “logical outcome”.

Meanwhile, Theresa May said such a vote would “break faith with the British people”.

It comes as Mrs May called off a vote on her Brexit deal last week as she looks for further assurances from MPs.

Councillor Davie described the Prime Minister’s deal as “pants” and added the “likelihood is high” that the UK will leave on World Trade Organisation terms or a revised deal.

Mrs May is expected to bring her deal with the EU back to the House of Commons next month.

The UK is set to leave the EU on March 29, 2019 and Councillor Davie said that a new leader of the Conservative Party should be in place following the exit.

Mrs May recently survived a “no confidence” vote within her own party meaning she cannot be challenged for 12 months.

But, Councillor Davie said the Prime Minister should step down to make way for someone new.

“We need someone with a vision, we need someone who is optimistic with the opportunities that Brexit creates,” he said.

“We also need someone who is a globalist who understands our future is with China, India and America and the emerging markets of Indonesia, Brazil and Mexico.”