Rise in number of fatalities from crashes over past year in county

Some of the floral tributes left at St George's Academy in Sleaford to Eliza Bill.
Some of the floral tributes left at St George's Academy in Sleaford to Eliza Bill.

Police and road safety organisations have pledged to renew afforts to reduce casualty numbers on Lincolnshire’s roads after a grim year in 2018 which saw an increase in fatalities.

Despite no great increase in collisions, the figures show they were significantly more lethal, according to the Lincolnshire Road Safety Partnership, a scheme supported by the emergency services and the county council.

Some of the floral tributes left at St George's Academy in Sleaford to Eliza Bill.

Some of the floral tributes left at St George's Academy in Sleaford to Eliza Bill.

John Siddle from the LRSP said: “We have ended 2018 with 56 fatalities from 48 collisions. 2017 saw 49 fatalities from 45 collisions, as you can see there is only a difference of three additional collisions however, an extra seven fatalities as a result.”

This included six crashes involving multiple victims, where two people were killed, and one where three died in one incident.

Mr Siddle said: “We cannot calculate the number of serious injury collisions until they are ratified by the Department for Transport as some are downgraded and some that were slight sometimes manifest themselves to serious.”

Among the headlines, he said eight of these collisions, resulting in nine deaths, have been drink or drug related.

Eight of those killed were pedestrians, including the tragic news earlier last month which saw 16 year old school girl Eliza Bill of Threekingham killed on the A15 at Osbournby, and 18 year old sixth former Millie Taylor-Noonan killed after a collision outside her school at Welbourn, within a few days of each other.

Fifteen of the people killed in 2018 were over the age of 70.

Mr Siddle went on: “Looking at the vulnerable groups, we have had some reductions in motorcycle deaths (11 in 2017 to 6 in 2018) although the average age last year went up to 53 years old.

“Work will continue with all the vulnerable groups, older drivers, young drivers, pedal cyclists, motorcyclists, pedestrians and those that drive for work. Delivery of road safety education in schools, awareness campaigns, enforcement and public engagement will continue.

“Our thoughts are with those families, we continue to support, who have lost loved ones on our roads.”